20th May 2019 – Shiz Aoki, BioRender, National Geographic Magazine

FB_IMG_1558333146841Shiz Aoki is a medical Illustrator, Johns Hopkins school of medicine alum, former Lead Science Illustrator at National Geographic, and a multi-winner of the Best Infographics in America award. After having spent a decade creating bespoke science illistrations for high-profile projects, Shiz’s focus has now been to democratize visual science communication for all scientists.
Shiz is currently the CEO and Co-Founder of BioRender, a web program that empowers researchers to create professional science figures in minutes. BioRender works with renowned institutions such as Harvard, Stanford, Cell Press, and more.
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13th May 2019 – Malcolm S Ramsay, University of Toronto

Malcolm RamsayHi! My name is Malcolm Ramsay (@MalcolmSRamsay) and I’m from Toronto, Canada, but I’m living in Hannover, Germany. I am a primatologist who wears different hats as a biologist, anthropologist, environmentalist, activist, and many more things without titles. I’m currently a PhD Candidate in Evolutionary Anthropology at the University of Toronto in Canada. I also did my MSc in Evolutionary Anthropology at the University of Toronto back in 2016 and my BA in Anthropology at the University of Waterloo in 2013. I work primarily in Madagascar on the unique and fascinating lemurs that inhabit the island. My PhD is examining how the smallest living primates (mouse lemurs) cope with increasing levels of habitat loss and fragmentation. While my work focuses on ecology and genomics, I am passionate about many other issues in biology and science more broadly. I look forward to talking to everyone on Biotweeps about primates, Madagascar, fieldwork, social justice, and whatever else comes up!

6th May 2019 – Jesse Czekanski-Moir, SUNY-ESF (Syracuse, NY, USA) / Belau National Museum (Palau)

Jesse Czekanski-MoirHi! My name is Jesse Czekanski-Moir and I’m a Ph.D. candidate in Conservation Biology at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) in Syracuse, NY, USA. The central projects of my Ph.D. include biogeography, community ecology, and evolutionary biology, especially of ants and land snails in Palau (Micronesia, Oceania). I’m also working on projects involving evolutionary simulations, ancient whole genome duplications in the Mollusca, and non-marine gastropod Phanerozoic diversity patterns. My Ph.D. advisor Rebecca Rundell and I will be co-leading a field course in Palau in a few weeks, so some of my tweets will likely involve fun facts about Palau biogeography, culture, and the conservation biology of invertebrates.

For further information, please check out Rebecca Rundell’s website:
www.snailevolution.org

and my profiles at Google Scholar, etc.:
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=QivVHUkAAAAJ&hl=en
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jesse_Czekanski-Moir
https://profiles.impactstory.org/u/0000-0003-2968-1893

29th April 2019 – Dead Birds of Rutgers – Newark, Rutgers University – Newark / New Jersey Institute of Technology

Dead Birds of RutgersLocated in the heart of the Atlantic Flyway, the Dead Birds of Rutgers – Newark (@deadbirdsofRUN) are a group of birds and the mammals who love them, committed to increasing awareness of window collisions in urban areas, particularly on the Newark campus of Rutgers University in New Jersey. What started as a small side project among friends has now grown into a dedicated team of bird enthusiasts: we document migratory and resident bird mortality that results from collisions with reflective glass during the day and lighted buildings at night. It is our hope that our growing dataset can be used in support of wildlife-friendly initiatives, and we look forward to connecting with other researchers who love birds as much as we do.

22nd April 2019 – Julie Teresa Shapiro, Institut national de la santé et la recherche médicale

Julie ShapiroHi everyone! My name is Julie Shapiro (@JulieTheBatgirl) and I’m an ecologist. I am originally from Brockton, Massachusetts but I currently live in Lyon, France, where I work as a post-doctoral researcher at the Institut national de la santé et la recherche médicale (National Institute of Health and Medical Research). I completed my PhD in Interdisciplinary Ecology in August 2018 at the University of Florida, where I studied bats. I was particularly interested in the different ways that human activity can affect bats, including their diversity, bacteria, and viruses. My current research is focused on the ecology of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals. I use ecological models to understand how the environment and characteristics of hospital wards affect the number of infected patients. I also love doing outreach and scicomm – especially with kids! Biotweeps was one of the first accounts I followed when I started using Twitter and I’m really looking forward to taking over next week! Expect to hear about bats, antibiotic resistant bacteria, scicomm, changing fields of research, moving to a new country, and maybe a picture of my cat!

Website: www.jtshapiro.com

15th April 2019 – Malaria Atlas Project, Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, IHME

Malaria Atlas ProjectThe Malaria Atlas Project (www.map.ox.ac.uk) is a research group within the University of Oxford. We assemble global databases on malaria risk and intervention coverage in order to develop innovative analysis methods that use those data to address critical questions. By evaluating burden, trends, and impact at fine geographical scale, we support informed decision making for malaria control at international, regional, and national scales. We are committed to open access and release all our data on a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

8th April 2019 – Wes Wilson, UWA / NCARD / Mostly Science

Wes Wilson_2.pngWes Wilson is a Canadian cancer researcher and science communicator currently based in Australia. His previous research looked at the epigenetic changes in childhood brain tumours, asking the kinds of questions like what kinds of gene expression changes made a low-grade glioma become a high-grade glioma? He then moved on to study the formation of breast cancer and characterized a new mechanism in tumorigenesis of this disease. His current work is in the adult cancer mesothelioma and focuses on developing new treatment approaches to this universally fatal disease by harnessing modern immunotherapy strategies and leveraging novel synergistic therapies. You can hear about some of his immunotherapy work here in his TEDx UWA talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFuRqKQwxKA .

Wes is the founder of the science communication page Mostly Science ( www.fb.com/mostlyscience ) and host of the corresponding Mostly Science Podcast ( https://mostlyscience.com/webcast/ ) where the look to pull the curtain back on science in the headlines and explores the what and why of the world around us.  He also serves as the editor of science curation group Science Seeker (@SciSeeker), host of the LifeOmic series TumourTalk, and President of the Science Communication Society @ UWA.

His also has a passion for technology and has been an avid developer and tinkerer since he was a kid. Taking apart computers and devices to learn how they work and teaching himself how to code. This interest has led to many exciting projects including but not limited to creating a mobile app for delivering medical resources to expecting mothers in the Yukon Canada, creating a hardware wearable device for medication non-compliance, working on a machine learning algorithm for diagnosing brain tumours, and more machine learning algorithms for working with large data sets involved in single cell sequencing data.