22nd July 2019 – Steven Allain, University of Kent/Zoological Society of London

Steven AllainSteven is a current PhD candidate at the University of Kent where his research focuses on the population dynamics of the barred grass snake (Natrix helvetica) and the effects of snake fungal disease (Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola). Steven holds a BSc Zoology from Anglia Ruskin University and an MRes in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation from Imperial College London. Throughout his academic career, Steven’s main interests have been the conservation of amphibian and reptiles. This has taken many forms over the years including population monitoring and investigating for the influence of disease. One of the projects which you may be aware of is the monitoring of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) in Cambridge, where Steven has been coordinating a project to investigate the population size and to also screen for disease since 2015.

Steven is actively involved with the conservation of the UK’s herpetofauna but is also involved in projects across the world. Steven’s research has also seen him travel to a number of countries including Germany, Malaysia and Tanzania. Some of Steven’s affiliations include the British Herpetological Society (where he is a council member), Save the Snakes (where is on the advisory board) and the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Amphibian and Reptile Group (where he is chairman). Aside from Steven’s strong passion for the natural world and particularly of herpetofauna, he also has a strong scientific background too. With a large number of publications under his belt before starting his PhD, it is clear that Steven strives to improve our understanding of amphibians and reptiles as well as making this information available. You can find out more about Steven by visiting his website: http://www.stevenallain.co.uk/

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11th February 2019 – Daisy Maryon, Univeristy of South Wales, Kanahau Utila Research and Conservation Facility, International Iguana Foundation

Daisy MaryonDaisy Maryon is a conservation biologist specializing in endangered iguanas. She is an active member of the IUCN iguana specialist group and,works closely with the International Iguana Foundation. Currently works as research coordinator at Kanahau Utila Research and Conservation Facility in Utila, Honduras, where she is carrying out her PhD on Utila spiny-tailed iguanas with the University of South Wales. Before Daisy found her love of iguanas she worked in the cloud forests of Honduras with Operation Wallacea, leading expeditions of students, she also spend time in Indonesia radio tracking slow lorises with the Little Fire Face project and, worked at Riet Vell nature reserve in Spain with Birdlife international.

On the small island of Utila Daisy works with Kanahau to research and conserve the Critically Endangered Utila spiny-tailed iguana and other endemic species.

Research takes Daisy and the team to Utilas wild western side and unforgiving interior, for a small island there are some incredibly diverse habitats from sandy beaches, to  mangroves to wet neotropical savannahs and hardwood forests.

Education and outreach is a key component of this work as the iguanas are endangered due to habitat destruction and the fact they are considered a delicacy. Known locally as the Swamper on the island due to its habitat preference of mangrove forests, the Utila team came up with the “#SaveTheSwamper” campaign to rally support for the iguanas. Daisy so far has trained one ex hunter as a conservation field guide and hopes to be able to continue to provide more training and alternative incomes to hunting. Now the battle is on to promote the Swamper as a flagship species for the island and ensure the small population can be conserved.

26th February 2018 – Andrew Durso, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Utah State University

100px_amdAndrew Durso was born in New York and grew up catching snakes in North Carolina. He earned a B.S. in Ecology from the University of Georgia in 2009, an M.S. in Biology from Eastern Illinois University in 2011, and a Ph.D. in Ecology from Utah State University in 2016. He writes a blog about snakes called ‘Life is Short, but Snakes are Long’. He currently lives in Jena, Germany, where he works as a scientific editor for the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry.

14th November 2016 – Indicators and Assessments Research Unit, Institute of Zoology (ZSL)

zslUnderstanding how biodiversity responds to ecosystem change is critical for effective conservation. From the behaviour and dynamics of individuals and populations to the global distribution and extinction risk of species, our research focuses on the challenges of monitoring biodiversity across these different scales.
zsl_davidMonday 14th November DAVID JACOBY @DJacoby_Marine

My research seeks to use electronic tracking devices and network analyses of animal movements to understand connectivity and grouping behaviour in ecological communities. I’m interested in how aggregation, collective movement and social interactions can fundamentally impact the persistence and vulnerability of a species, helping us to mitigate against threats. Most of my research is within the marine environment where I study the dynamics and drivers of social networks in apex marine predators such as sharks. I also have a soft spot for freshwater eels.
zsl_lpiTuesday 15th November THE LIVING PLANET INDEX @LPI_Science

The Living Planet Index (LPI) is a measure of the state of global biodiversity based on population trends of vertebrates from around the world. The Living Planet Database (LPD ) currently holds over 18,000 population time-series for more than 3,600 mammal, bird, fish, reptile and amphibian species. A small team of four is currently working on the upkeep and updates of the database and on all related analyses. The latest Living Planet Report was released at the end of October with new LPI results showing there has been an average decline of 58% in vertebrate populations between 1970 and 2012. Follow our Biotweeps takeover for an in-depth look at the report and updates on the rest of our work.
zsl_robinWednesday 16th November ROBIN FREEMAN @Robin_Freeman

I’m the Head of the Indicators and Assessments Unit. My research spans many disciplines from understanding the status and trends of global biodiversity, the creation of new kinds of technology for monitoring and tracking animals in the wild, to remote fieldwork utilising those technologies and new methods for analysing and interpreting the data we are now able to collect.
zsl_nrlThursday 17th November NATIONAL RED LIST @NationalRedList

The National Red List Project collates the conservation status of species across a large number of taxonomic groups, much like the internationally recognised IUCN Red List, but on a regional or national scale. This means that the red lists can be readily incorporated into national biodiversity strategies and action plans and can inform local or national conservation, development and planning processes. Here in Indicators & Assessments, 220,411 species assessments from 161 countries and regions worldwide have been uploaded to our database. We recently received a huge influx of red lists to be processed, which will keep our team of four quite busy for a while!
zsl_monikaFriday 18th November MONIKA BOHM @MonniKaboom

I am primarily researching how we can use extinction risk as an indicator of species’ status and trends over time – which means I get to work with the IUCN Red List and on a large number of different species groups. My personal favourites: reptiles, freshwater molluscs, butterflies and dung beetles! I am also interested in climate change vulnerability of species, biodiversity monitoring in general, capacity building for conservation and science communication & public outreach. Expect a mixture of all of the above during my Biotweeps takeover!
zsl_pieroSaturday 19th November PIERO VISCONTI @pvisconbio

My research focus is in predicting future distribution, population trends and extinction risk of terrestrial vertebrates under future global change scenarios. I am also interested in understanding early warning signals of changes in ecosystem function. Expect lots of tweets talking about the future!

3rd of October 2016 – Kelly O’Connor, Archbold Biological Station

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I’m a wildlife biologist with a masters in Natural Resources Conservation from the University of Connecticut, and a research background focusing on wildlife-habitat relationships and non-game species conservation. I’m a research assistant at Archbold Biological Station, a non-profit research organization located in the Lake Wales Ridge region of Florida. In partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Department of Defense, I’m part of a team studying gopher tortoises on a large military installation in central Florida, specifically population dynamics of tortoises across different habitat types, and occupancy of juvenile gopher tortoises.

Outside of research, I love to be outdoors with camera in hand. Expect lots of pictures from the field, as well as a look at what other kinds of research are being done at Archbold (there’s a lot!), and thoughts on navigating the first year out of grad school. 

You can follow me after Biotweeps @kmoconnor8, or at kellymoconnor.weebly.com