13th August 2018 – Danny Haelewaters, University of South Bohemia

Danny HaelewatersFrom when I was able to utter my first few words as a baby I wanted to become a veterinary scientist, but you know how things go in life. So … I became an assistant-salesman, an all-rounder at a hotel and even the running manager of a bed and breakfast in the rural South of France. However, the science was never too far away – it’s in my blood – so meanwhile I became a biologist and earlier this year I graduated from Harvard University with a PhD in organismic and evolutionary biology. Speaking about some change!

These days I am a postdoctoral researcher, currently at the University of South Bohemia (Czech Republic) and starting November 2018 at Purdue University. I am a mycologist, with interest in phylogenetic relationships and associations with other organisms. My PhD research at Harvard University focused on Laboulbeniomycetes biotrophic fungi. I worked on resolving phylogenetic relationships and patterns of speciation. As a postdoc in the Czech Republic I continue my work with “labouls” but I also work on a project on parasitoid wasps that are natural enemies of ladybirds. At Purdue, I will characterize fungal microbes associated with romaine lettuce through a combination of experimental and next-generation sequencing techniques. A lot of diverse projects, and I haven’t even mentioned my interest in Leotiomycetes fungi.

I have a wife and daughter (Luna, almost 2) but I identify as bisexual. I have had relationships with guys and have no problem talking about this with LGBT+ or straight/gender-conforming people. I care about diversity a lot. We founded the Diversity and Inclusion Committee of the Mycological Society of America, which I chaired this past year. This Committee organized a symposium “Boosting Diversity in Mycology” at the International Mycological Congress in Puerto Rico, focusing on contemporary issues such as (lack of) diversity, LGBT+ in STEM fields, and unconscious bias

Advertisements

29th May 2017 – Rutger Vos, Naturalis Biodiversity Center

Rutger VosMy name is Rutger Vos, and I am computational evolutionary biologist at the natural history museum of the Netherlands, Naturalis. My educational background is in evolutionary biology, most especially in phylogenetics, i.e. the field of biology that concerns itself with researching the Tree of Life. For my PhD research, it became clear that I needed to handle amounts of tree and alignment data that were unmanageable to do ‘by hand’ on a normal computer, so I taught myself programming and how to use high-performance computing systems.
One thing led to another and I ended up doing my postdocs as a contributor to various infrastructures having to do with phylogenetics, most notably the CIPRES (http://www.phylo.org) project and TreeBASE (http://www.treebase.org) – but also projects having to do with data standards and data sharing in biology. ‘Open Science’, basically.
Meanwhile, the high-throughput DNA sequencing (NGS) revolution was starting to spit out more and more genomes, with which I started to play around. So much so that by the time Naturalis started looking for a bioinformatician to contribute to the NGS projects that were going on over there I could plausibly apply for a position.
At Naturalis I’ve become involved in a lot of different projects, all of which have bioinformatics or computational biology in common but are otherwise very broad-ranging. I’ve had the good fortune to be able to work with many of the kinds of data, information and knowledge that circulate in a natural history museum. For example, apart from DNA I’m also analyzing image data from our specimen digitization efforts, scanned texts, and species traits and distributions.
On Twitter (@rvosa) I let out my interest in ‘unnatural history’. It’s a totally vague term that I’ve adopted to look at and talk about the cultural ways in which we interact with nature. I mean things like art about nature; the way we, biologists, do science about nature; how we as a species are colliding with biodiversity because of our actions. By the way, I later found out there’s also a book called ‘Unnatural History’. I haven’t read it but it looks neat and it looks like it’s partly about the same topic.

7th March 2016 -Luis Verde Arregoitia, Natural History Museum Bern

Luis Darcy Verde ArregoitiaI’m interested in mammal diversity – past, and present. Through my research I aim to identify the mechanisms that generate spatial and taxonomic patterns of diversity, and the processes that threaten it. My broader interests include ecomorphology, mammalian evolution, biogeography, and phylogenetic comparative methods. I’m currently a postdoc at the Natural History Museum Bern in Switzerland, and my ongoing project involves relating ecology, morphology and phylogeny in rodents using museum collections and molecular phylogenies.

I am a mammalogist by training. For my PhD (University of Queensland: 2010-2014), I investigated the relationship between phylogeny and extinction risk in mammals. This research explored how the evolutionary age of a lineage relates to its current extinction risk (it doesn’t) and the effects of extinctions on phylogenetic diversity and tree topologies. Before that, I studied the ecology of bat migration for my BSc research thesis as part of a biology degree at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM; 2004-2009). I will be talking about museum collections, natural history, bats and rodents, and my experiences in mammal research.