14th August 2017 – Inés Dawson, University of Oxford

Ines DawsonInés is a final year interdisciplinary DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research, with a strong background in biological sciences, involves studying the biomechanics of insect flight, specifically how an insect’s flapping wing and body kinematics translate into the complex aerial manoeuvres performed during free flight. This combination of biology and engineering is aimed at inspiring the next generation of bio-inspired MAVs.

Apart from her research, Inés is also an award-winning science communicator in English and Spanish and runs two YouTube channels, Draw Curiosity and Inés-table, in order to make science stories interesting and internationally accessible. She is an enthusiastic and engaging educational speaker who enjoys informing and entertaining audiences of all ages and nationalities about different aspects of science.

In addition to her personal science communication work, she has also collaborated with BBC World Service, Discovery, Merck and Naukas to help put a human face on scientific research.

http://youtube.com/DrawCuriosity and http://youtube.com/Inestable and http://drawcuriosity.com

 

3rd July 2017 – Lauren Diepenbrock, North Carolina State University, Entomological Society of America

Lauren DiepenbrockI am an insect ecologist working in integrated pest management as a postdoctoral research scholar at North Carolina State University. This basically means that I study the ecology of insect pests and incorporate that into management programs to help growers produce healthy crops. At NC State, I study a challenging invasive vinegar fly, spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), a nearly worldwide pest that impacts small fruit crops (cherry, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, etc.). I also manage a multi-institutional Specialty Crops Research Initiative grant working with researchers all over the United States on coordinated research addressing the management of spotted wing drosophila.

Prior to my postdoc position, I did a Master’s at Florida State University where I studied the seasonal natural history of trap-jaw ants (Odontomachus brunneus) in North Florida with Dr. Walter Tschinkel. I consider myself very fortunate for this opportunity to observe these organisms and learn about their unique behaviors. The observational skills that I learned during this work have been helpful both in my PhD and postdoctoral research.

I did my doctoral research with Dr. Deborah Finke at the University of Missouri. For my dissertation, I looked at the impacts of resources, historical land use, and invasive species on native lady beetle communities in tallgrass habitats in Missouri. Tallgrass prairie was once the predominant land cover for much of this region and has, over time, been converted to agricultural land. I wanted to understand how changes in land use and the restoration of some lands to tallgrass prairie impacted insect communities, and I chose to focus on lady beetles because of recent studies documenting negative impacts of invasive lady beetles (e.g. Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata) on native species. One of our major findings is that grasslands (native or agricultural) are really important for promoting the persistence of native lady beetles.

During my week on BioTweeps, I’ll talk about natural history, insect ecology, beneficial and pest insects, integrated pest management, and ongoing research.  There will likely be random cat pictures, discussion of experiences from grad school and beyond, how to make the most out of interesting opportunities along the way, the hunt for a faculty position… and anything else that is of interest at the time. I’m happy to answer whatever insect questions that I can and refer those that I cannot answer to people who can.

22nd May 2017 – Seth Barribeau, University of Liverpool

I’m an evolutionary ecologist who largely works on understanding how insects are able to do complicated things with what is generally considered a ‘simple’ immune system. Spoiler: it’s not that simple. I am fond of most animals, with the noticeable exceptions of ostriches (they have cruel, dead, eyes) and locusts (a childhood incident). I started out studying the what predisposes tadpoles to infection as a graduate student in New Zealand, and after a brief stint catching snakes, teaching English, and proof reading medical articles in Japan, moved on to studying aphids and fungus-growing ants at Emory University, and then bumblebees at the ETH in Zürich. After studying and postdoc-ing in several countries I recently started a position as the lecturer for eco-immunology at the Institute of Integrative Biology at the University of Liverpool.
My recent research has explored why aphids have a pretty rubbish immune system, why the costs of mounting an immune response differ among individuals, how diet influences the expression of immunity, how bumblebees respond differently to different genotypes of a common parasite, what makes immune memory, what does sociality do to the evolution of the immune system, and, most importantly, was Marvin Gaye right? Is there such a thing as sexual healing?

7th November 2016 – Julia Koricheva, Royal Holloway University of London

julia-korichevaHi everyone! I am a Professor of Ecology at Royal Holloway University of London, UK. I have started my scientific career in Russia (when it was still part of the Soviet Union) with BSc in Zoology/Entomology from St Petersburg State University. I did my PhD in Finland, at University of Turku in Prof. Erkki Haukioja’s research group. My PhD project was on effects of air pollution on interactions between birch trees and insect herbivores feeding on them.

My first postdoc was at University of Zurich in Switzerland in EU Project BIODEPTH which studied effects of grassland diversity on ecosystem functioning. Involvement in this project made me interested in biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research, and, after returning back to Finland, I have established a large-scale long-term Satakunta forest diversity experiment. It was one of the first forest diversity experiments initiated specifically to study effects of tree species and genetic diversity on forest ecosystem services and processes, and I still return to Finland every summer to conduct field work there.

My second postdoc at Swedish Agricultural University with Prof. Stig Larsson introduced me to meta-analysis and research synthesis. I became a big fan of meta-analytic approach and has been using it ever since to combine results of studies on various research topics in basic and applied ecology. I have also been teaching courses on meta-analysis in ecology for early career researchers around the world from Finland to Mexico, Brazil and Tasmania.

For the last 12 years I have been working at Royal Holloway where my research is focussing on three main areas: research synthesis and meta-analysis in ecology, forest diversity and ecosystem functioning, and plant-herbivore interactions. I am also involved in teaching a variety of field- and lab- based ecology courses at RHUL.

You can follow me on Twitter @KorichevaLab

Our forest diversity project website: www.sataforestdiversity.org

My website: https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/julia-koricheva(ab83b389-7258-48fd-8560-0c8de7b6c94a).html

1st August 2016 – Martin Johnsson, Linköping University, Sweden

Martin JohnssonI am a postdoctoral researcher at Linköping University in Sweden. I am interested in the genetic basis of quantitative traits, in applying genomic tools to quantitative genetics, and in chicken domestication. That is, I use computers and pipettes to figure out what genes and genetic variants make domestic chickens different from wild chickens, and feral chickens different from both of them. I am also involved a bit with fruit fly and dog genetics.

Domestic animals have changed a lot from to their wild cousins. Just compare a domestic layer, broiler or fancy breed chicken to the Red Junglefowl, or a pug to a wolf. These evolutionary changes happened during the last 10 000 years — a few thousand less for the chicken, and a few more for the dog. Thus, domestic animals are great for studying genetic differences in traits. Populations and breeds are genetically different from each other, and from wild populations. Also, Red Junglefowl are still here, and can interbreed with domestic chickens, so that we can make crosses between them.

In our group, we work with a intercross of layer chickens and Red Junglefowl. Each individual carries a different mixture of domestic and Red Junglefowl variants. We then measure all kinds of traits that vary in the intercross population. For instance, we record body mass, reactions in different behavioural tests, gene expression in different tissues, and so on. Then we type them for a set of genetic markers, and find the markers that are associated with differences in traits. Thus, we build up a map of the genetic basis of chicken domestication.

During this week I will tweet about all of this. There will also be notes from the everyday business of research. At the time of writing this bio, I am not sure what I will be working on during the week, but laboratory selfies and an inordinate fondness for chicken combs is to be expected. See you on Twitter!

20th June 2016 – Luke Tilley, Royal Entomological Society

Luke TilleyLuke Tilley did his undergraduate biology degree at the University of Sheffield within the Animal and Plant Sciences Department. At Sheffield, Luke mainly focussed on whole-organism ecology and zoology, and he developed a devotion to insects and entomological research. He went on to do a PhD in entomology at the University of York, working on parasitic wasps as biocontrol agents for horticultural pests. During his time at York, his enthusiasm for insects continued to grow and he became the UK postgraduate representative for the Royal Entomological Society and organised student entomology conferences and public events, including the first Insect Festival in York which he continues to organise to this day.

After his PhD, Luke worked for several years as a research manager at Stockbridge Technology Centre (STC), North Yorkshire. At STC, he managed projects on invertebrate biodiversity, and horticultural and agricultural entomology. He also worked on educational projects and campaigns around Yorkshire. Whilst working at STC, Luke was elected a Fellow of The Royal Entomological Society and appointed National Insect Week (NIW) Coordinator. NIW is a biennial campaign, organised by the RES, the aim of the week is to remind everyone of the importance of insects and entomology in their everyday lives, achieved through a national programme of events and activities. Still at STC, Luke began to work as technical editor and editorial support for the scientific journal Ecological Entomology.

Since 2012, Luke has been the Director of Outreach and Development for the Royal Entomological Society. This role involves overseeing the external affairs of the RES to help achieve its principal aim of “the improvement and diffusion of entomological science”. Most of his time is spent organising events and campaigns, managing publications and outreach programmes, and giving talks. He also coordinates the educational and media activities of the Society. The next National Insect Week is 20 -26 June 2016, when the country will be encouraged to celebrate the “little things that run the world”.

November 16th 2015 – Sarah Paul, University of Exeter

Sarah PaulI am just finishing up my PhD at CEC Exeter. In final few months at the mo.

Research:

I am interested in the way that maternal effects mediate reproductive responses not only to natural environmental fluctuations but also to the myriad of anthropogenically driven environmental changes such as invasive species, pollution, pesticide use, and climate change.

I am currently investigating how reproduction, including maternal effects, in the aposematic UK native ladybird Adalia bipunctata is influenced by the invasive Harmonia axyridis and native Coccinella septempunctata ladybirds. I focus on alterations in per offspring maternal investment in chemical defence and signalling honesty, both of which influence offspring survival. The main aim of my research is to understand the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect the levels of toxins in individuals, and the costs and benefits associated with being toxic, and being exposed to toxins in the diet within an intraguild predation system.

Research page:

http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/cec/staff/postgradresearch/index.php?web_id=Sarah_Paul&tab=research
Other science stuff:

I’ve been involved in a heap of outreach events, mostly in my first and second years. I started my PhD after a 4 yr undergrad at Cardiff with a NERC funded placement year at Silwood Park and then two years of various paid research assistant jobs. Interested in pure and applied science.