21-22 June 2018 – The second Biotweeps Twitter Conference, #BTCon18

Biotweeps_Logo_cropThe first Biotweeps Twitter Conference, #BTCon17, brought together 60 presenters from 12 countries, from across the biological sciences. The conference was extremely successful, engaging 1,200 people and with an estimated global audience of 22 million people (see our Nature Communications article, here).

The conference returns this year as BTCon18, split over two days between the 21-22 of June, 2018. It will feature invited presenters as well as plenty of presentations selected from submitted abstracts. Presenters will be using the hashtag #BTCon18, which can also be used to track participants, throughout. The main @Biotweeps Twitter account will also be re-tweeting presentations.

The schedule and all abstracts can be found on the #BTCon18 website! 

 The programme consists of presentations from invited experts, as well as those from people who successfully submitted abstracts. Presentations will be scheduled in one of three time-zone regions each day:

  • Session 1: 1700 – 2100 BIOT (British Indian Ocean Time; GMT +6; CST +12)

  • Session 2: 1700 – 2100 GMT (Greenwich Meridian Time; BIOT -6; CST +6)

  • Session 3: 1700 – 2100 CST (Central Standard Time; GMT -6; BIOT -12)

The conference has nine broad themes – conservation, ecology, genetics, health\disease, interdisciplinary, molecular\micro, palaeo, science communication and technology. All sessions will be collected as Twitter Moments so that you even if you’re unable to follow the conference live, you can catch up later.

You can follow the conference by following the hashtag #BTCon18 and we encourage you to take part by asking questions (don’t forget to use the hashtag!). We look forward to talking to you.

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11th June 2018 – Anne Berlin, DC Web Mavens, Women of Email

Anne BerlinAnne is a consultant in digital outreach for campaigns geared at health empowerment and behavior change. Her expertise is in designing, formatting and editing websites and other digital content that encourages patient awareness, self-efficacy and activation. Most recently, she held a position as Director of Digital Strategy for the Lupus Foundation of America.

She has done #scicomm professionally for several years, with an emphasis on biomedical research, the drug development pipeline and public health.

29th of August 2016 – Muhammad Adnan Ashraf, University of Agriculture Faisalabad

[Admin] The contributor’s week was truncated due to content which was deemed to be problematic. It was agreed that it was in the best interests of all parties that he not continue.
Adnan A MalikGreetings readers!  I have been interacting biologists/ scientists at @biotweeps for quite a period. I found the forum very interesting and teased amusingly Dr. Anthony to not including someone from Asia particularly from Pakistan as curator at @biotweeps. To my surprise, he welcomed me instantly from the core of heart. Any biology reader has something worth sharing, feel free to schedule your week.
I am PhD candidate with Microbiology major at Institute of Microbiology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan. I have done with six semesters and hope to complete doctorate in a year or so. Although subjects in my studies were not narrowed down to any sub-discipline, I chose working on modification of bacterial amylase enzyme to improve industry oriented characteristics in it. To a bit detail, I am working on engineering amylase to make it thermostable via site-directed mutagenesis. Nowadays I am PhD scholar and Research Fellow at the same institute.
I have a diverse areas of interest based on different kinda majors and projects I have been through. Apart from the interest in enzyme engineering, I am basically a veterinary graduate having Vet Medical Council license. I have enjoyed a lot managing and treating farm animals and pets. In my masters, I worked on USDA funded project based on biocontrol of Aedes mosquito species. Being engaged to veterinary science and microbiology, I am interested in One Health and zoonosis as well. As Teaching Assistant, I have taught many courses at graduate as well as undergraduate level. In my leisure, rather when I am not ‘sciencing’, I am equally interested in cricket, bodyweight training, exercise physiology, movies and documentaries.
In my week as curator at @biotweeps, I ll be tweeting on veterinary science, microbiology, one health, biological control and enzyme engineering interspersed with exercise physiology. I ll briefly share routine life of graduate student and researcher at my institute to @biotweeps. Feel free to interact me at @adnan_a_malik.

March 16th 2015 – Wes Wilson, University of Queensland / UBC

Wes WilsonWes Wilson is a molecular biologist in Canada, whose work is focused on proteins involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis as well as previous studies on the epigenetics of tumor progression in pediadric brain cancers. He has a passion is for the health sciences and occasionally blogs over at MostlyScience (http://mostlyscience.com/) to help demystify evidence based medicine. Wes is also an ardent programmer and developer and sits on one of the organizing committees for Hacking Health (http://www.hackinghealth.ca/) where both his interests collide. Wes is also the academic life editor over at ScienceSeeker (http://scienceseeker.org/) and you can follow his science and other coffee fueled endeavors on his twitter @WesleyWilson (https://twitter.com/WesleyWilson).

September 1st 2014 – Adam Hayward, University of Edinburgh

Adam HaywardI’m interested in understanding why animals of the same species seem to vary so much. Why are some bigger than others? Why do some live longer? Why are some so susceptible to infections? Is this variation due to genetic differences or variation in the environment? Animals have limited energy which they must divide between growing, reproducing, rearing offspring and immunity to parasites. These characteristics all affect the number of offspring they produce, and through natural selection, genetic variation in such characteristics leads to evolution. In wild populations, animals vary hugely in how  many parasites they harbour. My favourite question right now is: what determines how big a parasite infection an animal gets, and how badly that infection affects them? I’m an evolutionary ecologist by training, and have spent time doing fieldwork on sheep on a remote Scottish island, and on elephants in the Burmese jungle. I find the struggle between parasites and their hosts absolutely fascinating, and the diversity of life-cycles that parasites have evolved truly  staggering. I’m looking forward to talking about how hosts and parasites are continually evolving to get on top and how studies in the wild can help us to understand these interactions better.