28th August 2017- Julie Blommaert, University of Innsbruck

Julie BlommaertHi Biotweeps!

I’m Julie (@Julie_B92) and I’m really looking forward to hosting biotweeps and chatting to all of you this week about my interests and research!

My research interests all focus around evolution and genetics. I guess I should start with a little background about how I got to be interested in these topics. Growing up, I wanted to be a vet, but then a few life things pushed me away from vet school, and for a while I didn’t know which direction I’d like to go in, other than not-vet. I considered being a pilot, and was even lucky enough to be gifted a test flight for my 16th birthday, but decided that, even though flying is fun, I didn’t think I’d like it as a job. I still hope to get my private pilot’s licence though! A few months later, we started to focus on genetics in my biology classes, and I was hooked!

Fast-forward a few years, and I found myself at the University of Otago, doing my BSc majoring in Genetics. We had so many chances to do different lab projects and experiments, and I found my interests in EvoDevo (Evolutionary developmental biology- the field that compares how different species develop to get a deeper understanding of how different forms evolved). So that’s what I did my honours project in, looking at some genes that control early development in a weird animal called a rotifer (a tiny, cute zooplankton). I had some further adventures in EvoDevo, but I’m now doing my PhD in evolutionary genomics.

My PhD project focuses on the evolution of genome size in, coincidentally, the same species of rotifer that I worked with for my honours project! So, what is genome size and why do we care? Genome size refers to the amount of DNA per cell of any species. Usually, different individuals of the same species have the same amount of DNA per cell as each other, but not my rotifers! Within the same species, their genome size can vary by up to 30%, which is really weird. But again, why do we care? Genome size varies a lot across the whole tree of life, and there are lots of debates about why this might be. Lots of people have tried to make comparisons to figure out why this might be, but often, there have been other things that get in the way of comparing genome sizes because the species being compared were so different. So, hopefully, we can study genome size change in a single species and learn a bit more about why genome size changes, and why some genomes (including our own), seem to be mostly “junk”.

Other than my PhD work, I really like spending time outdoors; climbing, hiking, relaxing in the sun, and I also play for my local canoe polo team.

I’ll talk more about my work and hobbies through the week, I hope you’re as excited about this week as I am!

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October 27th 2014 – Özge Özkaya, University of Leicester

Ozge OzkayaÖzge Özkaya was born in Ankara, Turkey. She moved to the UK after her first degree and lived in Leicester and London. She has a BSc. in Biology, an MSc. in Molecular Genetics and a PhD in Developmental Biology.

Currently she is working as a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Leicester on developing a new model of Huntington’s disease in the fruit fly. Huntington’s disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disease for those affected and their families.  It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder meaning that individuals who have the faulty gene will certainly develop the disease some time in their life. To date there is no known cure but Özge and her colleagues are working on a model to understand the early stages of the disease long before the symptoms (which are involuntary movements, depression and dementia) appear. Studying the early stages of the disease can help better understand the biology and progression of the disease and help finding a cure.

When she is not working on the bench, Özge enjoys engaging in outreach activities and communicating her findings to the general public and school children.