27th August 2018 – Paul Julian, University of Florida

Paul JulianI’m Paul Julian (@SwampThingPaul), a recent PhD graduate from the University of Florida Soil and Water Sciences Department in Gainesville, FL. During my PhD studies, I was also working full-time (and continues to work post-PhD) at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) supporting Everglades Restoration efforts. In addition to working at FDEP I am also a Postdoctoral Associate in the Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience at University of Florida under Dr Todd Z Osborne.  My PhD research focused on understanding biogeochemical processes within the Everglades Stormwater Treatment Areas (wetlands) including nutrient spiraling, nutrient stoichiometry, aquatic productivity and carbon dynamics.  Generally, I have diverse and varied research interests (webpage link) all revolve around aquatic ecosystems biogeochemistry, ecology and management. My current research interests are split between marine and freshwater wetlands studying the effects of climate change, eutrophication, ecosystem management and restoration on ecosystem function. I like to say that my research spans the aquatic continuum from fresh to marine aquatic ecosystems.

My other academic achievements pre-PhD include obtaining a BSc of biochemistry from Benedictine College (Atchison, Kansas, USA) and MSc of Environmental Science from Florida Gulf Coast University (Fort Myers, Florida, USA). My masters work involved studying Florida Panther (Puma concolor coryi) habitat selection and home range dynamics in response to exotic plant removal and management within Big Cypress National Preserve (Florida, USA). Post-bachelor’s degree I immediately entered the work force studying coastal water quality, estuarine dissolved organic matter dynamics and harmful algae blooms in southwest Florida. After several years I decided it was time to purse an advanced degree and took a detour studying something outside of my existing background (wildlife ecology). I was a rather un-traditional student and while working full-time I pursed my master’s degree. After obtaining my master’s degree I moved onto studying seagrass ecology and later to Everglades restoration with a focus on water quality which led me to the wetland biogeochemistry lab at University of Florida where I (un-traditionally) achieved my PhD.

Outside of work and school I like to get lost in nature by going on long hikes through the bush, document my adventure with photography (Flickr), snorkel and scuba dive, cook vegan meals, exercise and be overall active.

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23rd of July 2018 – Stacey Felgate, National Oceanography Centre (NOCS) / University of Southampton

Stacey FelgateI am a 1st year PhD candidate in marine biogeochemistry at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS). At the age of 31 I obtained my BSc Hons in Marine Science from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS-UHI) during which time I  won a Carnegie Trust Summer Research Bursary to study the impacts of a simulated Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) facility, sailed aboard RRS Discovery for a month sampling the Rockall Trough and Iceland Basin, then completed a fellowship at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) to study coastal carbon storage with the US Geological Survey. My undergraduate study focussed on the various ways in which the world’s oceans and coastal zones can help to mitigate climate change. My final year thesis focussed on the natural carbon storage capacity of saltmarshes, using a range of isotopic markers to understand whether a marsh was storing or releasing its historic carbon.

After graduating, I undertook an internship at the UK Environment Agency where she worked within the Marine Management and the Estuarine and Coastal Monitoring and Strategy chemicals teams before taking up graduate study at the University of Southampton. For my PhD, Stacey is currently working on understanding what happens to organic matter produced on land when it enters rivers and moves towards the open ocean. A large portion of this organic matter enters rivers, but very little is known about what happens to it in transit, and even less is known about where the ~50% of it that doesn’t make it to the ocean ends up. I’ll be taking over @Biotweeps fresh from 2 weeks in the North of Scotland, conducting an intensive study of the Halladale river catchment.

Aside from the science, I’m really interested in issues of equality and in how healthy the way the scientific community handles ‘different’ is. I also think we should never stop talking about what makes effective science communication and how we can all become better at it.

5th March 2018 – Laura Treible, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Laura TreibleLaura is a 4th year PhD candidate in marine biology at UNC Wilmington. She obtained her BS in Environmental Science from the University of Delaware in 2010, and then an MS in Marine and Atmospheric Science from Stony Brook University in 2013. Her MS thesis work focused on ctenophores (comb jellies) in Long Island Sound, NY. This project involved quantifying the abundance and biomass of ctenophores and determining the relative importance of ctenophores to nutrient cycling within the estuary.

For her PhD, Laura is currently working on understanding drivers of global jellyfish populations and examining the response of early life stages of scyphozoan jellyfish (polyps and ephyrae) to various environmental conditions. Jellyfish are often claimed to be robust to environmental change, specifically factors such as such as temperature, hypoxia, and coastal acidification. The complex life cycle and short generation time of scyphozoans leads to the ability to answer questions regarding environmental stress and change. In general, Laura is interested in understanding how anthropogenic impacts and climate change interact and affect organisms and ecosystems at various temporal and spatial scales.

Laura can be found on Twitter @aqua_belle, tweeting about #jellyfish, #climatechange, #womeninSTEM, #scicomm, and trying to #pomodoro through the last year of her dissertation. While Laura is usually based in Wilmington, NC, she will be taking over @Biotweeps from KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) in Saudi Arabia, where she is visiting to work with a coauthor.

20th March 2017 – Jez Smith, Cardiff University, Eco-explore CIC

Jez SmithHi all! I’m Jez, a 2nd year PhD student at Cardiff University with a NERC GW4+ funded project. My academic passion is studying a small long distance migrant bird, the Pied Flycatcher which is currently in a steep population decline, hence my twitter handle @PiedflyWales. Using novel statistical techniques called Integral Projection Models (IPMs) I hope to try to understand the effect size that various factors have on population trends and which areas management and policy should be focussed on to reverse their fate. I have had the pleasure to study the Pied Flycatcher in Wales, Portugal and Ghana and am interested in all aspects of avian behaviour and migration. Some of my tweets will therefore be focussed around the topics of climate change, birds and animal behaviour.

Other tweets will revolve around different International days this week such as the International day of the forests and world water day. I want to share some of the amazing work that is being done on these topics both academic and non-academic.

One issue that I feel strongly about is the work life balance issue and so will therefore also be wanting to hear from people about their passions outside of work even if it relates to work (i.e. bird ringing). For me, besides my academic research I spend my time competing on the university Latin and Ballroom dance circuit, with a distinct preference for Jive.

Prior to the PhD I worked as a data analyst, expedition leader and ornithologist with experience having participated in and lead expeditions in Europe, Africa and Central America. I have co-lead a Senegalese research expedition with Dr. Rob Thomas identifying causes of decline in Reed and Sedge warblers, contributing to Dr James Vafidis’ PhD. All of the above are co-directors, with Dr Alexandra Pollard, of Eco-Explore (http://www.eco-explore.co.uk).

I’m looking forward to sharing some of my research with everyone and hearing others opinions on their work and the work of others.

Cheers
Jez

21st November 2016 – Lindsey Thurman, Oregon State University

lindsey-thurmanI am a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University and a Research Fellow with the Northwest Climate Science Center. I’m in my 5th (and final!) year, which is exciting and slightly terrifying. My research focuses on the link between local (community) and landscape (biogeographic) drivers of biodiversity patterns in an effort to improve predictions about community-level response to climate change. I typically use amphibians as a model system because, not only are they extremely sensitive to environmental change, they exhibit diverse life history strategies, differential plasticity, and complex community dynamics.

My dissertation research aims to provide a diverse assessment of amphibian species vulnerability and adaptive capacity to climate change. The experimental portion of my research has involved the quantification of complex direct and indirect interactions among co-occurring amphibian species under natural and novel environmental conditions (e.g. climate warming and rapid pond drying). I examine how shifts in these conditions alter individual species sensitivity and the strength and direction of species interactions, and conversely, how coevolved interactions mediate the effects of climate change factors. Within this context, I examine the costs vs. benefits of behavioral and physiological plasticity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation.
I am also particularly interested in how species respond to climate change as a complex network of interacting species and how these inter-dependencies affect the footprint of amphibians on the landscape. You may see me tweeting about the use (and often misuse) of co-occurrence data as a method for incorporating biotic interactions into species distribution models.
I got my M.Sc. at Oregon State, but before coming to the great Pacific Northwest I did my undergrad at the University of Florida (Go Gators!). I hail from the flatlands of Florida’s beautiful Gulf Coast and grew up in Gulf Breeze (a tiny peninsula town near Pensacola Beach). When I’m balancing work with life, I like to do most anything outdoors like salmon fishing, duck hunting, hiking and playing with my youthful 8 year old Lab, Sierra.
Looking forward to talking with my fellow Biotweeps! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter @ectothurm, check out my personal website www.lindseythurman.com, or join us at the Early Career Climate Forum (@ECCForumwww.eccforum.org

14th November 2016 – Indicators and Assessments Research Unit, Institute of Zoology (ZSL)

zslUnderstanding how biodiversity responds to ecosystem change is critical for effective conservation. From the behaviour and dynamics of individuals and populations to the global distribution and extinction risk of species, our research focuses on the challenges of monitoring biodiversity across these different scales.
zsl_davidMonday 14th November DAVID JACOBY @DJacoby_Marine

My research seeks to use electronic tracking devices and network analyses of animal movements to understand connectivity and grouping behaviour in ecological communities. I’m interested in how aggregation, collective movement and social interactions can fundamentally impact the persistence and vulnerability of a species, helping us to mitigate against threats. Most of my research is within the marine environment where I study the dynamics and drivers of social networks in apex marine predators such as sharks. I also have a soft spot for freshwater eels.
zsl_lpiTuesday 15th November THE LIVING PLANET INDEX @LPI_Science

The Living Planet Index (LPI) is a measure of the state of global biodiversity based on population trends of vertebrates from around the world. The Living Planet Database (LPD ) currently holds over 18,000 population time-series for more than 3,600 mammal, bird, fish, reptile and amphibian species. A small team of four is currently working on the upkeep and updates of the database and on all related analyses. The latest Living Planet Report was released at the end of October with new LPI results showing there has been an average decline of 58% in vertebrate populations between 1970 and 2012. Follow our Biotweeps takeover for an in-depth look at the report and updates on the rest of our work.
zsl_robinWednesday 16th November ROBIN FREEMAN @Robin_Freeman

I’m the Head of the Indicators and Assessments Unit. My research spans many disciplines from understanding the status and trends of global biodiversity, the creation of new kinds of technology for monitoring and tracking animals in the wild, to remote fieldwork utilising those technologies and new methods for analysing and interpreting the data we are now able to collect.
zsl_nrlThursday 17th November NATIONAL RED LIST @NationalRedList

The National Red List Project collates the conservation status of species across a large number of taxonomic groups, much like the internationally recognised IUCN Red List, but on a regional or national scale. This means that the red lists can be readily incorporated into national biodiversity strategies and action plans and can inform local or national conservation, development and planning processes. Here in Indicators & Assessments, 220,411 species assessments from 161 countries and regions worldwide have been uploaded to our database. We recently received a huge influx of red lists to be processed, which will keep our team of four quite busy for a while!
zsl_monikaFriday 18th November MONIKA BOHM @MonniKaboom

I am primarily researching how we can use extinction risk as an indicator of species’ status and trends over time – which means I get to work with the IUCN Red List and on a large number of different species groups. My personal favourites: reptiles, freshwater molluscs, butterflies and dung beetles! I am also interested in climate change vulnerability of species, biodiversity monitoring in general, capacity building for conservation and science communication & public outreach. Expect a mixture of all of the above during my Biotweeps takeover!
zsl_pieroSaturday 19th November PIERO VISCONTI @pvisconbio

My research focus is in predicting future distribution, population trends and extinction risk of terrestrial vertebrates under future global change scenarios. I am also interested in understanding early warning signals of changes in ecosystem function. Expect lots of tweets talking about the future!

27th June 2016 – Centre for Marine Futures, University of Western Australia

Centre for Marine Futures.pngBIG PICTURE THINKING

Our vision is global, with partnerships and field programmes in most ocean basins either side of the Equator. Past and current sampling sites include: Western Australia, Palau, New Caledonia, the Chagos Archipelago, Tonga, French Polynesia, the Savage Islands (Ilhas Selvagens), The Philippines, and the Gulf of Oman.

SCIENCE THAT MATTERS

Our goal is to make a difference
Our research boasts high academic and real-life impact. It is used to directly inform and influence both policy and management actions. We are a member group of the Ocean Science Council of Australia (OSCA), an independent consortium of leading Australian experts concerned with advancing marine conservation.

RESEARCH

Our research focuses on marine ecological questions relevant to conservation and largely explores the influence of human activities on marine ecosystems.

Key questions our research explores include:
– How do pelagic sharks and fishes respond to the establishment of large marine reserves?
– What roles do apex predators play in tropical marine ecosystems?
– How is climate variability manifested in fish growth and what does this mean for warming oceans?
– How are sharks and fishes distributed on biogeographical scales and in relation to habitat?
– What are the socioeconomic drivers of illegal fishing?

These questions are addressed using a range of techniques included BRUVS, telemetry, biomarkers and predictive modelling.

SCIENTISTS

Dr Phil Bouchet
Postdoctoral fellow
I am a jack of several trades – marine mammalogist by training, converted into shark/fish ecologist as a doctoral student. I have a keen interest in spatial ecology and statistical modelling as they relate to wildlife conservation problems. Recently I developed abundance models for a number of cetacean species (humpback whales, bottlenose and snubfin dolphins) and distribution models for large pelagic fish (tunas and mackerels) around Western Australia.
My PhD research concentrated on ‘hotspots’ of mobile marine predators, and how these aligned with prominent physical features of the ocean floor such as seamounts, submarine canyons, or offshore shoals and banks. This involved coordinating or partaking in field expeditions to Shark Bay, the Timor Sea and the Perth canyon, where I used a new generation of midwater baited underwater video cameras to film endangered oceanic sharks in deep-water environments.
Dr Shanta Barley
Postdoctoral fellow
Reef sharks are being removed from coral reefs globally yet we do not understand how this affects these hotspots of biodiversity. Where sharks are absent, prey may change in terms of abundance, size, behaviour, diet, condition and growth rate, which could have severe knock-on effects on the rest of the ecosystem.
I explore these issues using stereo underwater video systems, stable isotopes and a range of other techniques.
David Tickler
PhD student
I am investigating how spatial ecology and population genetics impact the exposure and vulnerability of sharks to illegal fishing on Indian Ocean reefs, and how social, economic and legal factors affect the scale and range of the fishing effort in these locations. The study will use a combination of ecological tools (fine- and broad-scale movement tracking and population genetics), fisheries data collection at landing sites, and interviews with fishers and other actors to collect data on both the ecology of reef shark species and the fisheries that target them.
The spatial ecology and genetic studies will help understand the role of large MPAs such as Chagos in providing a refuge to reef shark species, and its wider role for these species in the Indian Ocean based on the connectivity (or lack thereof) between sub-populations. The study of illegal fishing aims to help quantify the magnitude of illegal fishing in a large oceanic MPA, identify the key drivers of this activity, and suggest points of engagement with regional stakeholders that will reduce illegal fishing effort.
Charlotte Birkmanis
PhD student
I am a marine biologist with a special interest in shark behaviour and conservation. My research in shark ecology, behaviour and genetics focuses on the role of sharks as regulators of tropical and temperate ecosystems across the Indian Ocean.
This research involves studying a variety of shark species and their prey to discover the implications of reduced shark populations in our oceans, and to determine the relative health of sharks in the Indian Ocean. I attained a Bachelor of Science with distinction in ecology and a Bachelor of Arts in mandarin from Queensland University of Technology. Following on from this, my research on shark and ray biomechanics earned me a Bachelor of Science (Honours I) degree from the University of Queensland. My research will highlight the importance of sharks in our oceans.
Marjorie Fernandes
PhD student
Pelagic (open-water) marine ecosystems are the largest marine environment on Earth. A key ecological component of pelagic systems are their sharks and fishes. My research will explore spatial ecology and behaviour of sharks and fishes using observations from two large marine protected areas (MPAs), the Chagos Marine Reserve and the Palau Shark Sanctuary.
I will be looking at spatial structure and behaviour patterns relating to environmental and habitat characteristics, regarding three pelagic ecosystems key components: (1) juveniles fishes; (2) forage species, and (3) top predators. I will use an innovative, non-destructive and fishery-independent approach, remote underwater camera system to sample pelagic fish and shark. By improving our understanding of how pelagic species use the environment, it will also contribute to improved MPA design.