14th August 2017 – Inés Dawson, University of Oxford

Ines DawsonInés is a final year interdisciplinary DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research, with a strong background in biological sciences, involves studying the biomechanics of insect flight, specifically how an insect’s flapping wing and body kinematics translate into the complex aerial manoeuvres performed during free flight. This combination of biology and engineering is aimed at inspiring the next generation of bio-inspired MAVs.

Apart from her research, Inés is also an award-winning science communicator in English and Spanish and runs two YouTube channels, Draw Curiosity and Inés-table, in order to make science stories interesting and internationally accessible. She is an enthusiastic and engaging educational speaker who enjoys informing and entertaining audiences of all ages and nationalities about different aspects of science.

In addition to her personal science communication work, she has also collaborated with BBC World Service, Discovery, Merck and Naukas to help put a human face on scientific research.

http://youtube.com/DrawCuriosity and http://youtube.com/Inestable and http://drawcuriosity.com

 

31st July 2017 – Katrin Lohrengel, Sea Watch Foundation

Katrin LohrengelHi Biotweeps,

I’m the Monitoring Officer for the cetacean research charity, Sea Watch, based in New Quay, Wales. I run the Cardigan Bay Monitoring project which focusses on the local semi-resident bottlenose dolphin population that inhabits the two Special Areas of Conservation in Cardigan Bay. In practice this means that I spend less time than I’d like balanced on the bow of a boat with expensive camera equipment laughing – and cursing profusely- while trying to photograph dolphins and a lot of time in my office shouting at my computer. Despite the occasional frustrations of field work and the everyday computer niggles, I consider myself extremely lucky to be working in this position and am very proud to be part of a charity that has achieved so much on such a comparatively diminutive budget. Sea Watch has been monitoring cetaceans for over 20 years and was instrumental in the designation of Special Areas of Conservation in Cardigan Bay. Currently the Cardigan Bay Monitoring Projects provides annual reports and recommendations to Natural Resources Wales to report on abundance trends, habitat use, population structure and anthropogenic impact using a combination of vessel and land based surveys.

I have been working with Sea Watch for six years in various capacities, starting as a voluntary Research Assistant in 2011. I knew I wanted to return to Wales eventually but spent some time in my adopted home on the Wirral as Regional Coordinator where I set up a local network of volunteers to carry out land based cetacean observations as well as acquiring funding to run our first photo-identification survey of Liverpool Bay which confirmed the presence of Cardigan Bay bottlenose dolphins in the North West! Citizen science is a very important aspect of Sea Watch’s work, our sightings network relies on local volunteers to set up watches and report sightings and I was delighted when I had the opportunity to return to Wales as Wales Development Officer in 2013 with the aim to further and grow our local groups, liaise with boat operators and raise awareness of the fantastic marine wildlife that can be seen in Welsh seas.

I’m also a full time fantasy nerd (there’s been a distinct trend in dolphin names in the last few years…), devoted cat lady, travel enthusiast, least flexible yoga student in existence, one of those annoying, unembarrassed feminists and finally back in the saddle (in the literal sense) after a 15 year break!

My week at Biotweeps coincides with Sea Watch’s annual National Whale and Dolphin Watch so as well as telling you about the bottlenose dolphins of Cardigan Bay I will be encouraging you to go out there and get involved in some citizen science!

24th July 2017 – Cat Hobaiter, University of St Andrews & Kirsty Graham, University of York

Hi Biotweeps!

Catherine Hobatier.pngCat (@nakedprimate)

I’ve been a field primatologist with the School of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of St Andrews for the past 12-years. Much of that time has been spent living and working with the chimpanzees at the Budongo Conservation Field Station in Uganda, but I’ve also worked with baboons and gorillas, and at other sites across Africa.

These days I’m a full time lecturer, but I still get to spend around 5-months a year in the field. My main area of research is ape communication – in particular gestures; but I moonlight on other topics including social learning, tool use, and life history. Much of my work takes a comparative perspective on cognition – looking at the behaviour of modern species of apes (including us) for areas of similarity and distinction that might give us clues about its evolutionary origins.

Around 6-years ago I started the habituation of a new chimpanzee community in Budongo – the Waibira group – with over 30 independent males (10-15 being typical) it’s a whole new world of fun/data collection chaos! This summer I’m piloting a gesture project with the mountain gorillas in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park, which is where I’ll be tweeting from during our Biotweeps week (apologies in advance for some *very* excited tweets/unnecessarily frequent pictures of infant gorilla floof).

Outside of my day job I’m the VP for Communications for the International Primatological Society and if I’m really not working you can usually find me trying to climb up something (mountains, rocks, trees), or with a nice cup of tea and the world service on the radio.

Kirsty Graham.jpgKirsty (@kirstyegraham)

I’m basically a younger, taller version of Cat (we both have bizarre multinational accents and love rock climbing) who does the same research but with bonobos, the chimpanzee’s sexy cousin. I just finished my PhD at the University of St Andrews looking at how bonobos use gestures, what the gestures mean, and how their gestures compare to those used by chimpanzees.

At the beginning of this month, I started a postdoc at the University of York, UK. So while Cat will be tweeting from the field (note to Cat: NEVER apologise about pictures of infant gorilla floof), I will be tweeting from my office plotting my next fieldwork at Tangkoko, Indonesia, in January. From bonobos to Sulawesi crested macaques!

Last week, we launched an online experiment testing human understanding of great ape gestures. Cat and I found that bonobos and chimpanzees share most of their gestures and gesture meanings, and we want to know whether untrained humans give the same responses to the gestures as a bonobo or chimpanzee would.

So that’s us! We’re really looking forward to a Biotweeps week full of primate facts, fieldwork stories, online experiments, and gorilla floof!

3rd July 2017 – Lauren Diepenbrock, North Carolina State University, Entomological Society of America

Lauren DiepenbrockI am an insect ecologist working in integrated pest management as a postdoctoral research scholar at North Carolina State University. This basically means that I study the ecology of insect pests and incorporate that into management programs to help growers produce healthy crops. At NC State, I study a challenging invasive vinegar fly, spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), a nearly worldwide pest that impacts small fruit crops (cherry, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, etc.). I also manage a multi-institutional Specialty Crops Research Initiative grant working with researchers all over the United States on coordinated research addressing the management of spotted wing drosophila.

Prior to my postdoc position, I did a Master’s at Florida State University where I studied the seasonal natural history of trap-jaw ants (Odontomachus brunneus) in North Florida with Dr. Walter Tschinkel. I consider myself very fortunate for this opportunity to observe these organisms and learn about their unique behaviors. The observational skills that I learned during this work have been helpful both in my PhD and postdoctoral research.

I did my doctoral research with Dr. Deborah Finke at the University of Missouri. For my dissertation, I looked at the impacts of resources, historical land use, and invasive species on native lady beetle communities in tallgrass habitats in Missouri. Tallgrass prairie was once the predominant land cover for much of this region and has, over time, been converted to agricultural land. I wanted to understand how changes in land use and the restoration of some lands to tallgrass prairie impacted insect communities, and I chose to focus on lady beetles because of recent studies documenting negative impacts of invasive lady beetles (e.g. Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata) on native species. One of our major findings is that grasslands (native or agricultural) are really important for promoting the persistence of native lady beetles.

During my week on BioTweeps, I’ll talk about natural history, insect ecology, beneficial and pest insects, integrated pest management, and ongoing research.  There will likely be random cat pictures, discussion of experiences from grad school and beyond, how to make the most out of interesting opportunities along the way, the hunt for a faculty position… and anything else that is of interest at the time. I’m happy to answer whatever insect questions that I can and refer those that I cannot answer to people who can.

19th July 2017 – Goutham Radha, Howard University

Goutham RadhaEver considered why you choose the field that you chose? The very first time I saw rectus abdominis contracting in frog’s ringers attached to lever and a smoked Sherrington drum, I was awestruck. That is when I realized why I chose scientific research as my career. I worked on several research projects in Pharmacology during my Bachelors. It is during that time that I learned what it takes to do research.

After my Bachelors in Pharmacy, I worked towards a Masters in Cell and Molecular Biology. I worked in a lab working on Neurological Effects of HIV-1. Though a lot is established about what HIV-1 does in the peripheral body, we do not have much information about what it does in the brain. The virus can cross the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) and infect astrocytes, replicate and cause a latent infection. What worsens the condition, is that the Antireterovirals, do not cross the BBB, and hence the virus in brain is not affected. I used several methods in the lab to ascertain the effects of some of the viral proteins in astrocytes.

Currently, I’m working in a research lab at Howard University, in Washington, DC. The lab’s focus is to understand the pathology of Breast cancer. Aside from my research, I’m a Photographer and I love it. I have an almost active Instagram account and a website (which is still in progress, typical researcher, right?). Recently, I started playing Ultimate Frisbee and I absolutely love it. I try to stay active, run, workout, and Science!

12th June 2017 – Angela Watkins, Welsh Government

Angela WatkinsHi Biotweeps!

I’m currently a civil servant with the Welsh Government, working as Biodiversity Policy Officer in our Land, Nature and Forestry team. I’ve been a civil servant for the last nearly 3 years after having completed my PhD at the University of Southampton in 2014. My role mainly involves developing and delivering biodiversity and nature policy and evidence across Wales and supporting others to do the same.  I’ll hopefully be able to share a bit of insight into what this means during my week ‘(wo)manning’ the Biotweeps account.

A bit of background about me: My PhD was in the field of computational ecology, but I actually completed an integrated PhD as part of the Institute of Complex Systems Simulation, so I don’t have an easy answer when people ask me what my PhD is in! Normally depending on the questioner I’ll either say ecology, or complexity and ecology. In a nutshell, my research involved using complex systems theory to develop a model(s) that could test questions about the relationship between landscape ecology (i.e. connectivity) and species persistence and movement in that landscape. To make this sound cooler, I essentially studied the way that jaguars moved around a fragmented habitat in central Belize. I’ll explain a bit more about this too if you are interested!

My main research interests lie in landscape ecology and resilience, (but will broaden to agent-based modelling, conservation, population ecology) but I am keen to link this with real, direct, on the ground policy decisions and implementation. How can we use our theoretical knowledge to deliver real change in terms of conserving and enhancing our biodiversity?

I’m also a wife and mother of two young girls aged (almost) 5 and 15 months, a passionate feminist and promoter of #womeninscience, naturally. Normally I can be found on twitter @ecologywatkins.

5th June 2017 – Michelle Rodrigues, University of Illinois

Michelle RodriguesHi Biotweeps!

I am a primatologist/biological anthropologist interested in social relationships and how they help us deal with life’s stressors. My research centers around the tend-and-befriend hypothesis, which proposes that female friendship evolved as a primate-wide strategy to cope with stressors.  Additionally, some of my past and current research addresses the development of social relationship during juvenility and adolescence, and how it helps prepare for adult challenges.

Most of my graduate research was conducted at El Zota Biological Field Station, Costa Rica, with a little help from the spider monkeys at Brookfield Zoo, IL.  I did my Master’s at Iowa State University, where I studied the emergence of sex-segregated social patterns in juvenile spider monkeys. I completed my PhD at Ohio State University, focusing on female social relationships and stress in adult female spider monkeys to test the tend-and-befriend hypothesis.

My fieldwork experience includes research on howler monkeys in Nicaragua and Costa Rica, free-ranging rhesus monkeys at Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico, and gorillas and chimpanzees in Cameroon. I’ve also studied captive chimpanzees at the North Carolina Zoo, bonobos at the Columbus Zoo, and spider monkeys, big cats, and pachyderms at Brookfield Zoo.

Currently, I am studying a new focal species, humans! After stints as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Wake Forest University and online teaching with Eastern Kentucky University, I began a postdoc in the Laboratory of Evolutionary Endocrinology at the University of Illinois. With Kate Clancy, I am working on projects examining female friendship, stress, and depression in teenage girls, and how female friendship and social networks mediate workplaces stressors in female scientists of color. Along with my postdoc, I am also completing a certificate in Science Communication.

I’m also very interested in interspecies friendship, and my best friends are my cat and dog! I also met some of my best human friends through running. Last year I ran a half marathon and 25k, and this year I am attempting to train for the Chicago Marathon (although my injuries may have other plans). You can find me on twitter @MARspidermonkey, and read my blog posts at spidermonkeytales.blogspot.com  and http://lee-anthro.blogspot.com/