1st August 2016 – Martin Johnsson, Linköping University, Sweden

Martin JohnssonI am a postdoctoral researcher at Linköping University in Sweden. I am interested in the genetic basis of quantitative traits, in applying genomic tools to quantitative genetics, and in chicken domestication. That is, I use computers and pipettes to figure out what genes and genetic variants make domestic chickens different from wild chickens, and feral chickens different from both of them. I am also involved a bit with fruit fly and dog genetics.

Domestic animals have changed a lot from to their wild cousins. Just compare a domestic layer, broiler or fancy breed chicken to the Red Junglefowl, or a pug to a wolf. These evolutionary changes happened during the last 10 000 years — a few thousand less for the chicken, and a few more for the dog. Thus, domestic animals are great for studying genetic differences in traits. Populations and breeds are genetically different from each other, and from wild populations. Also, Red Junglefowl are still here, and can interbreed with domestic chickens, so that we can make crosses between them.

In our group, we work with a intercross of layer chickens and Red Junglefowl. Each individual carries a different mixture of domestic and Red Junglefowl variants. We then measure all kinds of traits that vary in the intercross population. For instance, we record body mass, reactions in different behavioural tests, gene expression in different tissues, and so on. Then we type them for a set of genetic markers, and find the markers that are associated with differences in traits. Thus, we build up a map of the genetic basis of chicken domestication.

During this week I will tweet about all of this. There will also be notes from the everyday business of research. At the time of writing this bio, I am not sure what I will be working on during the week, but laboratory selfies and an inordinate fondness for chicken combs is to be expected. See you on Twitter!

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One thought on “1st August 2016 – Martin Johnsson, Linköping University, Sweden

  1. I wish there were more postings on scientific topics in non scientific terms and published by individuals like yourself rather than organizations that pump out numerous postings filled with links before you actually get to the subject matter. Thank you for taking the time for this posting.

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